Nathaniel Mary Quinn

  • , Lately, 2017
  • , Big Mike, 2017
  • , X-Ray, 2019
    Black charcoal, gouache, soft pastel, oil pastel on Coventry Vellum Paper
    42 x 35 cm
    16 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches
  • , The Great Betrayal, 2019
    Black charcoal, gouache, soft pastel, oil pastel on Coventry Vellum Paper
    42 x 35 cm
    16 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches
  • , Studio Mate, 2019
    Black charcoal, gouache, soft pastel, oil pastel on Coventry Vellum Paper
    42 x 35 cm
    16 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches
  • , Double-Dare Uniform, 2019
    Black charcoal, gouache, soft pastel, paint stick, attached paper on Coventry Vellum Paper
    42 x 35 cm
    16 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches
  • , Blue Collar Man, 2019
    Black charcoal, gouache, soft pastel, oil pastel on Coventry Vellum Paper
    42 x 35 cm
    16 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches
  • , The Disappointed Victim, 2019
    Oil paint, paint stick, gouache, soft pastel, oil pastel on Linen Canvas
    46 x 33 x 2 cm
    18 1/8 x 13 x 0 3/4 inches
  • , The British Bookman, 2019
    Oil paint, paint stick, gouache, soft pastel, oil pastel on Linen Canvas
    40 x 30 x 2 cm
    15 3/4 x 11 3/4 x 0 3/4 inches
  • , The Plea, 2019
    Oil paint, paint stick, gouache, oil pastel on Linen Canvas
    46 x 33 x 2 cm
    18 1/8 x 13 x 0 3/4 inches
  • , Literacy Lab, 2019
    Black charcoal, gouache, soft pastel, oil pastel on Coventry Vellum Paper
    127 x 96,5 x 3 cm
    50 x 38 x 1 1/8 inches
  • , The Executive Director, 2019
    Black charcoal, gouache, soft pastel on Coventry Vellum Paper
    76,2 x 76,2 cm
    30 x 30 inches

Nathaniel Mary Quinn (b. 1977) creates hybrid, fractured portraits on paper and linen using charcoal, gouache, pastel, paint stick, and oil paint. His works are replete with art historical references to Cubism, Surrealism, Francis Bacon, and others, yet his process is also very personal, drawing from his memories, experiences, traumas, and family history growing up in Chicago’s Robert Taylor housing project. Nathaniel Mary Quinn balances the beautiful with the grotesque, the sinister with the benevolent, capturing the complexity of human emotion in a way that is individual and also representative of the human condition.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn has exhibited at galleries and institutions internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include Half Gallery, New York; Luce Gallery, Torino, Italy; M + B Gallery, Los Angeles; Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago; Bunker 259 Gallery, Brooklyn; Pace Gallery, London, England; and the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (MoCADA), Brooklyn, New York. He has also been featured in the group exhibitions at Artist Space, New York; The Bronx Museum of Arts; Albertz Benda, New York; Satori Gallery, New York; Susan-Inglett Gallery, New York; and Driscoll Babcock Gallery, New York; and in A Process Series | Here He Come: Black Jesus, curated by Jessamyn Fiore, Rawson Projects, New York. His work has been reviewed in numerous publications, including the New York Times, The Independent (London), AFROPUNK, the Chicago Reader, The Daily News, The New York Times, Huffington Post, and Time Out New York. He is the recipient of the Lorraine Hansberry Artistic, Performance, and Fine Arts Award and a two-time winner of the National Arts Club Prize. Quinn is included in the public collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Sheldon Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, among others. Nathaniel Mary Quinn, a native of Chicago, received his BFA from Wabash College and his MFA from New York University. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.


Exhibitions


Museum Exhibitions


News

  • From Nathaniel Mary Quinn

    « As I am moved, enriched, empowered, and inspired by the courage and fortitude of the brother Dr. Cornel West, I write: The murder of George Floyd was practically a public lynching, giving rise to heightened protests and mass demonstrations throughout America — and, indeed, in many parts of the world — highlighting, at last, that America has proven to be, on many levels, a failed social experiment.  The world is undergoing and witnessing America’s great moment of reckoning, where the long-standing correlation between the local and the global are most remarkably felt: sowing the seeds of unchecked greed that made concrete domestic inequality in tandem with America’s imperial, militarized, and violent tentacles around the globe.  Make no mistake, the collective seeds of violence operate as the obvious link that bounds the connective tissue between the external and the internal.  Such is most efficiently true in relation to the seed of white supremacy’s deep hatred of Black people within the context of a predatory capitalistic society obsessed with money, domination, and the marginalization of the “other.”  

    The American Empire’s foundation is shaken to its core, with uprisings from below, from the streets.  

    No doubt, George Floyd’s murderous lynching by the embodiment of white supremacist hatred by the name of Derek Chauvin ignited the fuse, but the outright failings of America’s predaceous capitalistic economy to adequately fulfill basic needs — food, healthcare, a quality education, jobs with decent wages — was the explosion.  The so-called promise of America’s legitimacy is bankrupt, and a multiracial check is past overdue. 

    Now, the youth and the streets are forcefully speaking, highlighting the hypocrisy and the abject blindness to their suffering and misery.  Simply put, they no longer believe in the legitimacy of the traditional American social contract.  However, rebellion, while being the sounding call, is not enough, for a Nonviolent Revolution is of the highest order; that is, enacting comprehensive, democratic sharing — power, wealth, resources, respect, organizing — and the radical transformation of the American Empire.  

    For, by all means, we cannot possibly, comfortably, and willingly return to the way things were. »  

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    Nathaniel Mary Quinn, I Imagine It Was a Burden at Times, 2019 - oil paint, paint stick, oil pastel, soft pastel, gouache on linen canvas - 50.8 x 50.8 x 2 cm; 20 x 20 x 3/4 in
    Courtesy of the artist and Almine Rech


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