Dialogues


Paris, Matignon

Opening on November 18, 2022.

Inquire about the exhibition:
inquiries@alminerech.com

The gallery is open from 11 am until 7 pm.

  • , Head, 1975
    Acrylic on polyurethane foam, on a wooden base
    58 x 29 x 21.5 cm
    23 x 11 1/2 x 8 1/2 in
  • , Eriko, 2021
    Edition 1 of 6 + 2 a/ps
    Bronze
    10 x 32 x 23 cm
    4 x 12 5/8 x 9 1/8 in
    overall size:
    100 x 35.5 x 26 cm
    39 ⅜ x 14 x 10 ¼ in
    Edition 2 of 6
  • , La Fiancée du Cheval, 1984
    Bronze
    88 x 33 x 28 cm
    34 5/8 x 13 x 11 Inches
    Edition 2 of 6 + 2 AP
  • , Bouba
    Bronze
    34 x 27 x 15 cm
    13 3/8 x 10 5/8 x 5 7/8 in
    Edition of 6 - Edition 4
  • , Compression Monaco (bleue), 1994
    Pièce unique
    Compression de brocs, tôle et peinture email
    200 x 150 x 13 cm
    78 1/2 x 59 x 5 in
  • , Cheek Fabric (peach), 2022
    Acrylic on canvas on wood
    149 cm
    58 1/2 in
    (diameter)
  • , Untitled
    Acrylic on wood, mounted on wooden board
    55 x 45 cm
    21 5/8 x 17 3/4 in
  • Caminos de agua, 2022
    Oil on canvas
    140 x 170 cm
    55 x 67 in
  • Caminos de luz, 2022
    Oil on canvas
    140 x 170 cm
    55 x 67 in
  • I riflessi di Marilyn, 2004
    Signed at lower right on the front: "Rotella"
    Decollage on canvas
    158 x 120 cm
    62 x 47 in
  • Stack 7, Cadmium Red, 2022
    Foam core, pigment, steel, concrete, plaster, sand
    193 cm with base; W-variable
    H excl base 93cm
  • Il riposo del cantante, 2005
    Decollage on canvas
    193 x 140 cm
    76 x 55 in

Press release

Almine Rech is pleased to present Dialogues a group exhibition featuring works by Karel Appel, Don Brown, Agustín Cárdenas, César, Günther Förg, Sylvie Fleury, Carlos Jacanamijoy, Annie Morris and Mimmo Rotella, on view from November 18 to December 22, 2022 in Paris, Matignon.

Some of the works in this show of major artists express a pure harmony. This is true of Don Brown’s bronze Eriko (2021), presented for the first time at Almine Rech, which represents a girl huddled on the floor, perched on a base of the same deep black. At first glance, she could seem to be a continuation of ancient sculpture or the Roman neoclassicism of Canova’s Cupid and Psyche. However, her clothing – a leotard – clearly anchors her in the current era. Her fragility and delicacy, emphasized by the oversized height of the base, make her a perfect allegory. In his quest for grace and the sublime, Don Brown is driven by a sense of detail and extreme refinement, where any idealization has disappeared.

Tangible harmony is also conveyed by the new work of British artist Annie Morris, whose artistic practice also includes painting, drawing, and tapestry. She studied under Giuseppe Penone at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris and shows a piece from Stacks, her symbolic series of towers made of colored spheres. In a fragile equilibrium, sculpted of plaster and sand, these mineral balls covered with pure pigments – particularly cadmium red, ultramarine blue, and emerald green – are stacked on a concrete base of similar verticality. The piece blends figuration and abstraction, collective and personal experience.

Quite different from this harmony but with a similar desire to grasp fragility, the oil painting Personnage (1969) and the multicolored painted sculpture Head (1975) by Karel Appel, cofounder of the CoBrA movement in 1948, fluctuate between the expressionistic grotesque and popular humor, between animality and a children’s drawing. Their resemblance to unbridled but meticulous art brut brings them into the territory of the unconscious.

— Charles Barachon