Vivian Springford


New York

The gallery will be open to the public Tuesday to Saturday from 11:00 to 5:00 PM, operating at a limited capacity of 25% occupancy. Advance appointments are encouraged and can be made by contacting:contact.newyork@alminerech.com

  • , Untitled, 1978
    Acrylic on canvas
    183.2 x 184.2 x 3.8 cm
    72 1/8 x 72 1/2 x 1 1/2 in
  • , Untitled, 1971
    Acrylic on canvas
    127 x 127 cm
    50 x 50 in
  • , Untitled, 1969
    Acrylic on canvas
    117.2 x 119.7 cm
    46 1/8 x 47 1/8 in
  • , Untitled, 1972
    Acrylic on canvas
    124.5 x 124.5 cm
    49 x 49 in
  • , Expansionist Series, 1977
    Acrylic on canvas
    131.8 x 127 cm
    51 7/8 x 50 in
  • , Untitled, 1984
    Acrylic on canvas
    101.6 x 101.6 cm
    40 x 40 in
  • , Untitled, 1984
    Acrylic on canvas
    76.2 x 76.5 cm
    30 x 30 1/8 in
  • , Untitled, 1984
    Acrylic on paper
    121.9 x 121.9 cm
    48 x 48 in
  • , Untitled, 1977
    Acrylic on canvas
    95.6 x 95.6 cm
    37 5/8 x 37 5/8 in
  • , Untitled , 1983
    Acrylic on canvas
    69.2 x 67.3 cm
    27 1/4 x 26 1/2 in
  • , Untitled, 1972
    Acrylic on canvas
    141.9 x 141.3 cm
    55 7/8 x 55 5/8 in
  • , Untitled, 1978
    Acrylic on canvas
    114.9 x 165.1 cm
    45 1/4 x 65 in
  • , Untitled, 1975
    Acrylic on canvas
    151.8 x 151.8 cm
    59 3/4 x 59 3/4 in
  • , Untitled, 1973
    Acrylic on canvas
    121.9 x 121.9 cm
    48 x 48 in
  • , Untitled, 1977
    Acrylic on canvas
    152.4 x 152.1 cm
    60 x 59 7/8 in
  • , Unt, 1974
    Acrylic on canvas
    147.6 x 148 cm
    58 1/8 x 58 1/4 in
  • , Untitled, 1970
    Acrylic on canvas
    111.8 x 111.8 cm
    44 x 44 in
  • , Untitled, 1971
    Acrylic on canvas
    130.8 x 125.1 cm
    51 1/2 x 49 1/4 in

Press release

The rediscovery of the paintings of Vivian Springford (1913-2003) has introduced a wonderful new voice to the resounding chorus of the New York School of twentieth century painting. Daughter of a wealthy New York executive, Springford attended Manhattan’s elite Spence School. But instead of attending one of the prestigious colleges to receive an education in the liberal arts, or perhaps marrying into another kind of respectability, she went directly from Spence to the Art Students League. And thereafter, Springford never swerved from her commitment to her art, or to the world of Manhattan’s avantgarde. Her entire career unfolded in the very center of the bohemian scene of the 1950s into the 1980s.


Selected press