Jameson Green


London

Opening on Wednesday, September 7, 2022 from 6 pm to 8 pm.

Inquire about the exhibition:
inquiries@alminerech.com

The gallery is open on Tuesday to Saturday, from 10 am until 6 pm.

  • , Pressed and Stressed, 2022
    Oil on linen
    152.5 x 127 cm
    60 x 50 in
  • The Artist, 2022
    Oil on linen
    198 x 178 cm
    78 x 70 in
  • , TBC, 2022
    Oil on linen
    152.4 x 127 cm
    60 x 50 in
  • , Head Study, 2022
    Oil on linen
    40.5 x 35.5 cm
    16 x 14 in
  • , TBC, 2022
    Oil on Linen
    152.5 x 122 cm
    60 x 48 in
  • The child who is not embraced by the village will burn it down to feel its warmth, 2022
    Oil on linen
    239 x 427 cm, in three panels, each 239 x 142.3 cm
    94 x 168 in, in three panels, each 94 x 56 in
  • , Transactions, 2022
    Oil on Linen
    61 x 76.2 cm
    24 x 30 in

Press release

Born in Connecticut in 1992 and based in New York City, Green has a BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York and an MFA in studio arts from Hunter College. His academic background in painting means his universe of references is broad and diverse. Still, there’s no need for a degree in art history in order to appreciate his paintings. It’s not about matching a source to a painting, though some of the artists Green cites in his works are easy to spot – those Van Gogh colours, the Picasso faces. Others can be more loose: a composition taken from one artist, a figure from another. There’s a hint of Lucian Freud, the influence of Leon Golub (an excellent draftsman, Green describes), the works of American Neo-Expressionist Robert Colescott and Viennese expressionist Oskar Kokoschka are clearly there in the colours. Green discusses Michelangelo and Rembrandt and Bill Traylor at once. It’s a collection of references that cuts through time and place, led by an interest in expression and emotion, and the way they combine in painting to resurface the world.  Like a vocabulary, like the way language shifts through use and socialising, the work of these painters that Green has come to admire over time, become part of his own vision.

— Orit Gat, writer and critic