Brent Wadden

René


Paris, Turenne

For the safety of our visitors and staff, masks must be worn by all visitors upon entrance and hand sanitiser will be provided at the door and throughout the gallery.

Inquire about the exhibition:
inquiries@alminerech.com

The gallery is open from 11 am until 7 pm.

  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    269 x 284 cm
    106 x 112 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    179 x 120 cm
    70 1/2 x 47 1/2 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    225 x 158 cm
    88 1/2 x 62 1/2 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    179 x 129 cm
    70 1/2 x 51 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    222 x 162 cm
    87 1/2 x 64 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    90 x 130 cm
    35 1/2 x 51 1/2 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    187 x 162 cm
    73 1/2 x 64 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    91 x 80 cm
    36 x 31 1/2 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    185 x 128 cm
    73 x 50 1/2 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    91 x 80 cm
    36 x 31 1/2 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    124 x 87 cm
    49 x 34 1/2 in
  • , Untitled, 2021
    Hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas
    80 x 89 cm
    31 1/2 x 35 1/2 in

Press release

From January 8 to March 5, 2022, Almine Rech Paris is happy to present Brent Wadden’s fourth exhibition at the gallery. The artist will show a dozen pieces produced in late 2021.  

In its apparent simplicity and elegance, Brent Wadden’s work embraces its decorative purpose. This absence of preconceived ideas is closely linked to the artist’s background and his points of reference.
When asked about the foundations of his work, Wadden mentions growing up and studying in Nova Scotia, where folk art is an integral part of the social fabric and plays an important role in local museums.
His early absorption of folk art and his exposure to crafts explain his interest in local traditions. Wadden lists as influences the quilts of Gee’s Bend, Alabama (which fascinated him early on), Japanese boro, and Moroccan Boucherouite rugs. Although their origins are different, these pieces — whether they are quilts, weavings, pieces of fabric, clothing, or rugs — have in common an evident freedom in their design, a modest relationship to materials, and a connection to skill (often self-taught). These creations involve slow manual work, which is far removed from our contemporary relationship to time. Their characteristics apply perfectly to Brent Wadden’s own work.

— Françoise-Claire Prodhon, art historian and art critic


Selected press