Edgar Plans

Once Upon a Time the French Literature


Paris, Front Space

For the safety of our visitors and staff, masks must be worn by all visitors upon entrance and hand sanitiser will be provided at the door and throughout the gallery.

Inquire about the exhibition:
inquiries@alminerech.com

The gallery is open from 11 am until 7 pm.

  • Photo : Aurélien Mole
    , Perrault, 2021
    Mixed on canvas
    100 x 81 cm
    39 3/8 x 31 7/8 in
    Photo : Aurélien Mole
  • Photo : Aurélien Mole
    , Baudelaire, 2021
    Mixed on canvas
    100 x 81 cm
    39 3/8 x 31 7/8 in
    Photo : Aurélien Mole
  • Photo : Aurélien Mole
    , The little Prince, 2021
    Mixed on canvas
    100 x 81 cm
    39 3/8 x 31 7/8 in
    Photo : Aurélien Mole
  • Photo : Aurélien Mole
    , Dumas, 2021
    Mixed on canvas
    100 x 81 cm
    39 3/8 x 31 7/8 in
    Photo : Aurélien Mole
  • Photo : Aurélien Mole
    , Nemo, 2021
    Mixed on canvas
    30 x 30 cm
    11 3/4 x 11 3/4 in
    Photo : Aurélien Mole
  • Photo : Aurélien Mole
    , The power of books, 2021
    Mixed on canvas
    150 x 280 cm
    59 1/8 x 110 1/4 in
    Photo : Aurélien Mole
  • Photo : Aurélien Mole
    , Almine Rech Art Notes June I, 2021
    Mixed on paper
    82 x 102 cm
    32 1/4 x 40 1/8 in
    Photo : Aurélien Mole
  • Photo : Aurélien Mole
    , Almine Rech Art Notes June II, 2021
    Mixed on paper
    82 x 102 cm
    32 1/4 x 40 1/8 in
    Photo : Aurélien Mole

Press release

Almine Rech presents Once Upon a Time the French Literature, a project by Edgar Plans, on view in the Front Space in Paris. 

Fascinated with graffiti, urban art, and comic books from an early age, Edgar Plans soon surrounded himself with pencils, pens, brushes, and colors and focused on painting and drawing. When he became an artist, he created an unusual world, populated with figures that are often close to the famous Japanese kawaii aesthetic, which encompasses everything that is cute, childlike, and very colorful, such as the Pokémon Pikachu, certain manga, and rainbow unicorns.

- Charles Barachon, art critic and writer