Bertrand Lavier

A cappella


Paris

Opening on Saturday, March 4th, 2017
from 6 to 8 pm

  • , Bleu de Cobalt foncé, 2017
    Acrylic on Cibachrome
    155 x 232 x 4 cm (framed)
    61 x 91 3/8 x 1 5/8 inches (framed)
  • Jaune de Cadmium , 2017
    Acrylic on Cibachrome
    155 x 232 x 4 cm (framed)
    61 x 91 3/8 x 1 5/8 inches (framed)
  • , Vert de Cobalt, 2017
    Acrylic on Cibachrome
    155 x 232 x 4 cm (framed)
    61 x 91 3/8 x 1 5/8 inches (framed)
  • , Walt Disney Productions 1947-2017 N°2, 2017
    Acrylic on inkjet print, artist frame
    204 x 167 x 9 cm (framed)
    80 3/8 x 65 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches (framed)
  • , Walt Disney Productions 1947-2017 N°1, 2017
    Acrylic on inkjet print, artist frame
    163 x 151 x 9 cm (framed)
    64 1/8 x 59 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches (framed)
  • , Paysages aixois, 2014
    Acrylic on traffic sign
    140 x 240 cm
    55 1/8 x 94 1/2 inches
  • , Sombernon, 2016
    Acrylic on traffic sign
    140 x 240 cm
    55 1/8 x 94 1/2 inches
  • , La Vénus d'Amiens, 2016
    Plaster
    177 x 106 x 106 cm
    69 5/8 x 41 3/4 x 41 3/4 inches
  • , Colonne Lancia, 2017
    Carved stone, car light
    170 x 27 x 31 cm
    66 7/8 x 10 5/8 x 12 1/4 inches
  • , Colonne Ford, 2017
    Carved stone, car light
    170 x 27 x 31 cm
    66 7/8 x 10 5/8 x 12 1/4 inches

Press release

Ad Reinhardt, who knew his stuff, once gave this both wicked and hilarious definition of sculpture: “something you bump into when you back up to look at a painting.” Since the beginning of his career over 40 years ago, Bertrand Lavier has always avoided this unfortunate dilemma by making light of the academic opposition between these two fine arts. For instance, his painted objects from the 1980s debunked one of the most classical assumptions about sculpture embodying what painting represses.