Genieve Figgis

  • The Happy Accidents of the Swing (after Fragonard), 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    120 x 100 x 4 cm
    47 1/4 x 39 3/8 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Hercules and omphale (after Boucher), 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    70 x 60 x 4 cm
    27 1/2 x 23 5/8 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Jupiter and Calisto (Boucher), 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    80 x 60 x 4 cm
    31 1/2 x 23 5/8 x 1 5/8 inches
  • The toilet of Venus (after Boucher), 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    50 x 40 x 4 cm
    19 5/8 x 15 3/4 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Lucifer and me (after Bouguereau), 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    80 x 60 x 4 cm
    31 1/2 x 23 5/8 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Erato the muse of love poetry (after Boucher), 2018
    Acrylic on panel
    50 x 40 cm
    19 5/8 x 15 3/4 x 1 5/8 inches
  • The confession of love (after Fragonard), 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    120 x 100 x 4 cm
    47 1/4 x 39 3/8 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Pink landscape, 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    200 x 100 x 4 cm
    78 3/4 x 39 3/8 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Wish you were here, 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    100 x 100 x 4 cm
    39 3/8 x 39 3/8 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Nude, 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    120 x 120 x 4 cm
    47 1/4 x 47 1/4 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Stage, 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    120 x 120 x 4 cm
    47 1/4 x 47 1/4 x 1 5/8 inches
  • 17th century Entourage, 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    120 x 150 x 4 cm
    47 1/4 x 59 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Velvet curtains, 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    80 x 100 x 4 cm
    31 1/2 x 39 3/8 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Knock knock, 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    80 x 60 x 4 cm
    31 1/2 x 23 5/8 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Floating, 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    60 x 80 x 4 cm
    23 5/8 x 31 1/2 x 1 5/8 inches
  • Portal, 2018
    Acrylic on canvas
    150 x 150 x 4 cm
    59 x 59 x 1 5/8 inches

Genieve Figgis' paintings share a similar dramatic bent as some Irish-English literature subjects from Edgar Allan Poe to Oscar Wilde, as well as acknowledged Old Masters such as Goya. Her scenes depicting bourgeois homes, traditional portraits, or landscapes are often haunted by spectral figures and leering creatures with canes and top hats. A sense of the charmingly macabre emerges from Figgis' combination of an apparent pictorial banality with dreamlike qualities.


Exhibitions


Museum Exhibitions


News

  • Genieve Figgis, The Great Women Artists Podcast

    Podcast available here

    In Episode 18 of The Great Women Artists Podcast, Katy Hessel interviews the world-renowned Irish artist, GENIEVE FIGGIS!! And WOW was it amazing to interview Genieve, whose vibrant, loosely rendered, liquid-like works that reimagine classical scenes I have been SUCH a fan of since her inaugural London exhibition at Almine Rech back in 2015!

    Working in oil and acrylic and at small- to mid-scale, Genieve Figgis produces paintings rich in color, texture, and humor. Striking the balance between figuration, her marble-style and liquid-like paintings are reminiscent of the 18th century Rococo style. 
    Born in Dublin and now based in County Wicklow, Figgis was always interested in art, however it wasn’t until she was in her thirties with two small children, that she completed her art education in 2012. Exhibiting across Dublin galleries, it wasn’t until Figgis used Twitter to display her artwork in 2014, which caught the attention of one artist in particular – Richard Prince – who introduced Figgis to the New York art scene.

    Often reimagining and re-staging historical works – from Boucher, Fragonard, and Watteau – Figgis is particularly interested in scenes that feature sumptuous domestic interiors and stately country homes. 
    It was such an honour to get to know and interview Genieve. We chat about everything from her strict Irish Catholic upbringing, what it was like entering a museum for the first time aged 19, going to art school later on in life, her ideas and interests behind her incredible painterly scenes, to her process and being an artist today.

    Photo: Portrait of Genieve Figgis by Doreen kilfeather, April 2017


Selected press

Due to the Coronavirus outbreak, all galeries are temporarily closed to the public, but remain accessible by appointment.