Ayan Farah, Max Lamb, Chris Succo & Peter Peri


London, Savile Row

  • , Wave - Mist, 2014
    Clay, mud, rainwater and indian ink on canvas
    200 x 150 cm
  • , Wave - Delta, 2014
    Clay, mud, rainwater and indian ink on canvas
    210 x 160 cm
  • , Wave - Fen, 2014
    Clay, mud and rainwater on canvas
    190 x 100 cm
  • , Untitled (Torn), 2014
    Mud and indian ink on linen
    200 x 90 cm
  • , Wave - Tamar, 2014
    Clay and rainwater on canvas
    120 x 90 cm
  • , The fun is in the hunt (BRG), 2014
    Oil and lacquer on linen
    230 x 172,5 cm
  • , I want the one that I can’t have (BRG), 2014
    Oil and lacquer on linen
    230 x 172,5 cm
  • , We don’t sleep and we forget (RG), 2014
    Oil and lacquer on linen
    230 x 172,5 cm
  • , Bronze table, 2011
    Bronze
    37,5 x 62 x 54 cm
  • , Bronze armchair, 2011
    Bronze
    66 x 48,3 x 46,5 cm
  • , Bronze shelf, 2014
    Bronze
    78,5 x 36 x 20,5 cm
  • , New Man (White), 2013
    Hand knotted silk carpet
    300 x 276 cm
    118 1/8 x 108 5/8 inches
  • , New Man (Grey), 2013
    Hand knotted silk carpet
    300 x 276 cm
    118 1/8 x 108 5/8 inches

Press release

Despite being on the early side of their careers, Ayan Farah, Chris Succo, and Max Lamb (born in 1978, ’79, and ’80 respectively) fill Almine Rech’s London gallery with a surprising amount of history. 

Chris Succo, a German artist, paints with a roughness gleaned from a youth spent on the road, and a softness, like the coo of Neil Young lyrics or the lines of poetry that title his paintings (YOU LOOK LIKE NIRVANA JUST BROKE UP, one quips). Succo is indulgent, even belligerent, in his application of paint, and this attitude—in which process, and a passion for the basic tactility of painting—trumps all other concerns. Channeling the personal evolution that Christopher Wool brought to painting, Succo’s newest canvases are an extension of his previous series, riffing off his signature “White Paintings,” in which spray-painted pigment shines through gestural layers of thick, white oil paint. This time, delicate markings recalling handwriting, heartbeats, or meandering scribbles à la Twombly appear on flat, further reduced canvases.[…]