Franz West

  • , Violet Lamp, 2008
    Metal, acrylic glass, electrical device, neon lights
    299,7 x 129,5 x 100,3 cm
  • , Nannerl, 2006
    Steel, coco mat, carpet
    98 x 192 x 81 cm
  • , Uncle Chair (with arm rests), 2008
    Metal and textile bands - indoor chair
    87 x 55 x 45 cm
  • , Uncle Chair, 2008
    Metal, textile bands - indoor chair
    84 x 51 x 52,5 cm
  • , Uncle Chair, 2009
    Metal and textile bands - indoor chair
    86,4 x 45,7 x 56,5 cm
  • , Uncle Chair, 2007
    Metal and textile bands - indoor chair
    87 x 46 x 45 cm
  • , Artists Chairs, 2010
    Stainless steel, epoxy resin, acrylic lacquer
    85 x 45 x 55 cm
  • , Untitled, 2007
    Gouache on foam cardboard, framed
    101,5 x 73 cm
  • , Ja! Natürlich, 2004
    Collage, acrylic laquer, foam core, mount
    76 x 101,5 cm
  • , Untitled, 2008
    Papier mâché, metal, styrofoam, lacquer, acrylic paint
    130 x 94 x 67 cm
  • , Untitled (from the series “Transfigured Past”), 2009
    Collage and acrylic paint on paper, mounted on canvas
    80 x 106,5 cm
  • , Untitled (from the series “Transfigured Past”), 2009
    Collage et peinture acrylique sur papier, monté sur toile
    80,5 x 106 cm
  • , Pommes d'Adam, 2007
    Papier-mâché, wood, plexiglass
    87 x 126 x 64 cm
  • , Untitled, 2007
    Gouache on foam cardboard, framed
    101,5 x 73 cm (framed) | 40 x 28 3/4 inches (framed)

Franz West, one of the key figures of the international art scene, was first influenced by the generation of Actionists and Performance artists of the sixties. His early sculptures, later called  "Adaptatives", made of wood and fragments of wire netting covered in papier mâché painted in white became the foundation of his practice. In the eighties, some of these sculptures, redeveloped on a large scale, would translate to outsized aluminum pieces or installations, exploring the relation to the body as well as to social issues. Franz West’s works went on to encompass the practices of painting and sculpture, as well as installations and monumental outdoor pieces. Rejecting the passive nature between objects and viewers, he continually intended to disconcert the viewers perception of an artwork.


Exhibitions


Selected press